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VENUE AND EVENT INFO

Support: Dirtwire, Will Evans

 

GA standing room. All ages.

Accessible accommodations should purchase a General Admission ticket and will be taken care of at the venue day of event.

Facebook: /WarsawConcerts Twitter: @warsawconcerts Instagram: @warsawconcerts Newsletter: sign up here

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Trevor Hall realized at a very young age that music was more than just a passion. As an eleven year old, playing harmonica beside his father in the cradle of the weeping willows of South Carolina, music quickly became his most intimate companion, guide and creative outlet. In his elementary years, he began to write his own songs and perform them locally.

 

At sixteen he recorded his first record, and the following year he left South Carolina to study classical guitar at Idyllwild Arts Academy, an international boarding school east of Los Angeles. There, Trevor was introduced to yoga and certain spiritual practices found in India, which greatly influenced his music and his life journey. During his senior year, Trevor signed a record deal with Geffen Records and his career as a musician formally began.

 

Trevor quickly broke through the music scene, with such early accomplishments in his career as having a song recorded on the Shrek the Third soundtrack, as well as joining a series of sold-out tours with artists such as Steel Pulse, The Wailers, Jimmy Cliff, Matisyahu, Michael Franti and Colbie Callait. Trevor’s quick rise on the scene, however, was ripe with challenges that conflicted with his spiritual life and devotional practice. In order to parallel his life’s path with the messages in his music, Trevor moved into a traditional Hindu ashram in Southern California in 2008. When not on tour, he lived as a monk and devoted his days to spiritual practice and service. His involvement with the temple affected his music and his music quickly became his practice.

 

Trevor Hall’s music – an eclectic mix of acoustic rock, reggae and Sanskrit chanting – echo with the names and teachings of divinities, while maintaining an incredibly and refreshingly universal message. While on the road, Trevor sees the stage as his moving temple, a place where he can share in the experience of his spiritual journey with his audience. Trevor’s annual trips to India also continue to serve as a source of creativity and motivation for his music. The precious lessons and experiences that he has harvested from his journeys East have moved Trevor to return a service to those whom have colored his music and his life so beautifully. Trevor uses donations collected at his live shows to help support an ashram in Allahabad, India, the home of his Guru, where underprivileged and orphaned boys and girls are given the chance at a better life and a traditional Vedic education.

 

Trevor’s self-titled debut album debuted on Billboard’s Heatseeker chart at #7 in 2009. It featured the single “Unity,” written and performed with his longtime friend, Matisyahu. Trevor was named one of the Top 20 New Artists by Music Connection magazine and in 2010 MTV named him one of the twenty emerging artists.

 

His follow up album, Everything, Everytime, Everywhere, was released in 2011 and debuted on the iTunes Rock Chart at #3, iTunes Top Albums at #12 and #8 on Amazon Movers & Shakers. The featured single, “Brand New Day” was used as the music bed for the CBS This Morning Show.

 

In 2013 at the age of 26, after touring consistently for ten years, Trevor decided to take a break from the stage and go on an extended pilgrimage to India. There he spent many weeks studying under a classical Baul musician born and trained in the villages of Bengal. Trevor returned from his trip and retreated deep into the green mountains of Vermont and Maine where he spilled all that he had learnt onto the page and into song, resulting in the release of Chapter of the Forest in 2014. It debuted at #3 on the iTunes Singer/Songwriter Chart and #17 on the iTunes Top Albums Chart.

 

His latest album, KALA, written in Hawaii and recorded in LA, was released August 21, 2015. It debuted at #2 on the iTunes singer/songwriter chart. KALA marks the final chapter in a trilogy that chronicles Trevor’s spiritual and musical journey over the past few years. “It’s a graceful amalgam of styles by a musician who loves to embrace the music of the world.” (Popmatters) 

 

Dirtwire

On the 20th anniversary of the formation of Kazakhstan’s new capital Astana, in a music festival held at the city’s center, Dirtwire takes the stage as the sole American act on the lineup. They assume their positions among laptops, kamale ngonis, jaw harps, space fiddles, whamola basses, and resonator guitars. They look out at the futuristic city, and present songs and rhythms built on traditions drawn from musicians the world over and millennia in the making.

Dirtwire finds themselves in Tokyo’s bluegrass venues, New York house clubs, and at the Red Rocks outdoor amphitheater in Colorado. They perform on pirate ships in Bali, desert festivals in the Australian outback, and dragon-sized art cars in Black Rock City, clad in caballero costumes to honor the history of their home state of California. From the west coast of the U.S. to far-flung destinations all over the world, these troubadours are welcomed for speaking the most unifying language there is: music.

Evan Fraser, David Satori, and Mark Reveley met at the California Institute of the Arts, where they each studied music traditions from around the world. Independently and together, they have since traveled to nearly every continent on musical missions of the most adventurous kind. From the favelas of Brazil to the holy Ganges in India, from Fela Kuti’s Shrine in Lagos to shamanic Maribou ceremonies in Guinea, From Native Reservations in the Southwest to the streets of New Orleans, the members of Dirtwire have gained their understanding of the sounds of the world by exploring it.

An important part of this journey has been acknowledging and honoring the traditions of indigenous populations, working to raise awareness about the challenges they face, and calling attention to their musical traditions and how the band has incorporated and drawn influence from them. Collaborations towards this end have included Tuvan throat singer Kongar-ol Ondar’s last musical recording, Mamadou Diabaté, the Grammy-winning Malian kora player, Vieux Farka Toure the legendary Malian guitarist, and Robert Yuldashev, Russia’s celebrated kurai flute virtuoso.

The spirit of their musical journey is best expressed in their live show, Where every set is a magician’s surprise show, an invitation to experience instruments that are often heard only as samples in electronic music and to celebrate the art of the instrument, not just the sound you can record from it. Future revival, swamptronica, spaghetti-step, electro-twang — whatever you want to call Dirtwire’s music, what matters is that you can dance to it, as sure as a lizard dances in the desert. At a Dirtwire show you can be guaranteed to hear and see a wide range of instruments being played and woven into an electronic music context, including melodicas, guitarjo, electric space fiddle, drums,  jaw harps, vocals, harmonica, jaw harp, melodica, overtone flutes, kamale ngoni, kalimba, toy megaphone, percussion, whamola, resonator guitar, fujara, ukulele, and Siberian ghostcatcher mouthbow.

The creative process between these old friends and their carnival of instruments is a combination of composition, improvisation, and psychedelics. Alongside music, Dirtwire has learned from other cultures that plants are teachers and an opportunity for a different kind of travel. With psilocybin sometimes songs appear fully formed, channeled without ego like a transmission from another place.

Dirtwire’s creative dynamic comes from mutual respect and an understanding of how far to push each other’s comfort level on musical ideas. Dirtwire is a collaborative transmission from the earth, a celebration of its diversity, and a testament to the power of music to reach across barriers. Come kick up some dust with them. See you at a show!



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